CARDI Grant Projects

CARDI has to date awarded funding to 37 research projects and networks through its grants programme. These projects cover a wide spectrum of research, reflecting the huge range of issues relevant to the ageing research agenda. They bring together researchers from many disciplines including medicine, gerontology, economics, psychology, physics, geography and sociology to work together in a cross-sectoral and interdisciplinary manner.

Details and results of the projects are available in this section.


Title

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZALL

The development of end of life care standards for people with end stage dementia

CARDI Involvement

Project Lead

Dr Suzanne Cahill, Dementia Service Information and Development Centre, the School of Social Work and Social Policy, Trinity College Dublin

Researchers: 

  • The School of Social Work & Social Policy and the Dementia Services Information Centre
    Trinity College Dublin
  • Dr Suzanne Cahill, Dementia Service Information and Development Centre and the School of Social Work and Social Policy, Trinity College Dublin
  • Dr Max Watson, University of Ulster and Northern Ireland Hospice
  • Ms. Daphne Doran, Quality Initiatives Consultancy

This group will examine the different standards of care that exist for older people in long stay care and work with older people to draw up specific standards to meet the unique and complex end of life care needs of people with dementia.

Read the full report here.

CARDI grant programme

The dimensionality of mortality in Ireland

CARDI Involvement

Project Lead

Dr Declan French, Queen’s University Belfast

Researchers: 

  • Professor Michael Moore, Queen's University Belfast
Conventional modelling and forecasting of mortality rates relies on identifying regularities in the data but in a quite ad hoc way. Analysis helps us to understand how mortality decline has occurred, whether the same factors are responsible for declines in all age groups and whether these factors are related over time.

The objectives of the project are to undertake a statistical analysis of the static and dynamic factor structure of Irish mortality data using techniques recently developed in macroeconomic forecasting.

CARDI grant programme

The living standards of older people before and after the recession

CARDI Involvement

Project Lead

Emeritus Professor Paddy Hillyard, consultant

Researchers: 

  • Dr Demi Patsios, Consultant
This project builds on an earlier CARDI grant for the report ‘Inequalities in Old Age’ by updating the basket of living standards measures using the latest official data from Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. It will cover five household possessions, participation in social activities, economising behaviours and serious financial difficulties and older people’s views on living standards.

The objectives of the project are to develop a harmonised Irish Living Standards Index for Older People, highlighting the impact of the recession and its effect on inequalities.

CARDI grant programme

Understanding disability and its contribution to inequalities in health

CARDI Involvement

Project Lead

Dr Mark O'Doherty

Mark O'Doherty's research as a CARDI Fellow will explore differences in trends in work related disability and in the way people report disability between nations and across different national health and welfare service contexts. The aim of this research is to develop expertise in the evaluation and assessment of work-related disability among older adults through the use of disability vignettes which will supplement self-reported disability.

CARDI grant programme

Understanding disability in older heart disease patients in Ireland

CARDI Involvement

Project Lead

Professor Frank Kee, Queens University Belfast
  • Professor Frank Kee, Queens University Belfast
  • Dr Kathleen Bennett, TCD 
  • Dr John Hughes, NISRA
This research seeks to assess the extent to which disability associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) varies by age, gender and socio-economic status.

It will report on life expectancy free of CHD related disability and related inequalities and examine risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, obesity, physical activity and psycho-social factors.

It will also evaluate how differences in healthcare and welfare systems in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland impact on disability following CHD.

CARDI grant programme

Universally designed built environments at the urban scale (UD-BUS network)

CARDI Involvement

Project Lead

Professor Mark Dyer, TrinityHaus, Trinity College Dublin

Researchers: 

  • Professor Mark Dyer and Dr Antoinette Fennell, TrinityHaus, Trinity College Dublin
  • Dr Yasemin Afacan, School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen's University Belfast
  • Professor Ruth Morrow, PLACE, the Architecture and Built Environment Centre for Northern Ireland
  • Dr Gerald Craddock, National Disability Authority
This network plans to build a large partnership that will study how the urban environment, in planning, design, architecture and engineering, can be accessed and used to the greatest possible extent by people of all ages.
 

Objective

To establish a multidisciplinary network and explore how to effectively implement research findings from stakeholder consultation into design practice.
 
CARDI grant programme

Using aerobic exercise to promote brain plasticity and increase functional capacity in older people

CARDI Involvement

Project Lead

Professor Richard Carson, Queen’s University Belfast School of Psychology - Now TCD

Researchers: 

  • Professor Richard Carson, School of Psychology, Queen's University Belfast - Now TCD
  • Dr David Craig, Medicine, School of Dentistry and Biomedical Science, Queen's University Belfast
  • Professor Giuseppe De Vito, and Dr Brian Caulfield, School of Physiotherapy and Performance Studies, University College Dublin
  • Dr Madeleine Lowery, School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering, University College Dublin
  • Dr Katherine Johnson, School of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin
  • Dr Aine Kelly, Department of Physiology, Trinity College Dublin.
For this project experts from nine different disciplines will pool their expertise to examine how physical exercise can promote brain function and help older people recover from neurological illness.
 

Objective

To establish whether brain plasticity, as induced by standard (non-invasive) transcranial cortical stimulation techniques, is enhanced in older people following aerobic exercise. The project results will directly inform the design and implementation of exercise based programs that promote brain plasticity.
CARDI grant programme

Pages